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Education & Prevention

go to >   CANDLE SAFETY
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   COOKING SAFETY
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   FIRE ESCAPE PLAN
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   SMOKE ALARMS
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   FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Scheduling a School Visit?

We enjoy coming to you or you visiting us, however, there are some rules for scheduling a visit that you must follow:

  1. If you wish to schedule a visit to your school or to a fire station, please call at least two (2) weeks in advance of your desired visitation date. Our Firefighters/EMTs/Security Officers are very busy personnel and you will not be able to get your desired time, date, or station without advanced notice.
  2. Be prepared to let us know what you need. Is this simply to say “Hi” and show the fire trucks or firefighters to your group? Or do you need some fire prevention and safety training for your students or group? How many in the group and what’s the age or education level?
  3. Have a first & second choice for a date and time you would like to have us visit or for you to come and visit the fire station with your group. Some days are already scheduled and our personnel are many times on calls, participating in scheduled training, or performing regularly scheduled duties. We want to accommodate you and can with some creative scheduling. Let us know when you need us.
  4. Lastly, call our Special Operations Officer at 912-354-1011 during business hours (9am – 4pm), Monday through Friday. She will be happy to check schedules and times see what can be arranged for you. If she is not there when you call, please leave a detailed message with our front desk. SOPs Officer Best will get back in touch with you as soon as she is available

Fire Education & Prevention

Candle Safety:
Blow Out before you Go Out.

Tip 1 Extinguish all candles when leaving the room or going to sleep.
Tip 2 Keep candles at least 1 foot away from things that can catch fire, like clothing, books and curtains. 
Tip 3 Use candle holders that are study, won’t tip over easily, are made from a material that cannot burn, and are large enough to collect dripping wax.
Tip 4 Keep candles and all open flames away from flammable liquids.
Tip 5 Keep candle wicks trimmed to one-quarter inch and extinguish taper and pillar candles when they get to within two inches of the holder. 
Tip 6 Votives and containers should be extinguished before the last half-inch of wax starts to melt.
Tip 7 During power outages, avoid carrying a lit candle. Use flashlights.   Southside Fire/EMS discourages the use of candles in bedrooms and sleeping areas.

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Cooking Safety:
Watch what you HEAT.

Tip 1

Always use cooking equipment tested and approved by a recognized testing facility.
Tip 2 Never leave cooking food on the stovetop unattended, and keep a close eye on food cooking inside the oven.
Tip 3 Keep cooking areas clean and clear of combustibles (e.g. potholders, towels, rags, drapes and food packaging). 
Tip 4 Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a “kid-free zone” of three feet (1 meter) around the stove. Keep pets from underfoot so you do not trip while cooking.  Also, keep pets off cooking surfaces and nearby countertops to prevent them from knocking things onto burner.
Tip 5 Wear short, close fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can dangle onto stove burners and catch fire.
Tip 6 Never use a wet oven mitt, as it presents a scald danger if the moisture in the mitt is heated.
Tip 7 Always keep a potholder, oven mitt and lid handy. If a small fire starts in a pan on the stove, put on an oven mitt and smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner. Don't remove the lid until it is completely cool.
Tip 8 Never pour water on a grease fire and never discharge a fire extinguisher onto a pan fire, as it can spray or shoot burning grease around the kitchen, actually spreading the fire.
Tip 9 If there is an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed to prevent flames from burning you and your clothing.
Tip 10 If there is a microwave fire, keep the door closed and unplug the microwave. Call the fire department and make sure to have the oven serviced before you use it again. 
Tip 11 Food cooked in a microwave can be dangerously hot. Remove the lids or other coverings from microwaved food carefully to prevent steam burns.

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Fire Escape Planning:
Exit Drills In The Home - Get Out and Stay Out.      

Tip 1 Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan.
Tip 2 Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. 
Tip 3 Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm. For easy planning, download NFPA's escape planning grid (PDF, 73 KB). This is a great way to get children involved in fire safety in a non-threatening way.
Tip 4 Make sure that you have at least one smoke alarm on every level of your home. Everyone in the household must understand the escape plan. When you walk through your plan, check to make sure the escape routes are clear and doors and windows can be opened easily. Choose an outside meeting place (i.e. neighbor's house, a light post, mailbox, or stop sign) a safe distance in front of your home where everyone can meet after they've escaped. 
Tip 5 Make sure to mark the location of the meeting place on your escape plan.
Tip 6 Go outside to see if your street number is clearly visible from the road. If not, paint it on the curb or install house numbers to ensure that responding emergency personnel can find your home.
Tip 7 Have everyone memorize the emergency phone number of the fire department. That way any member of the household can call from a neighbor's home or a cellular phone once safely outside.
Tip 8 If there are infants,  older adults or family members with mobility limitations make sure that someone is assigned to assist them in the fire drill and in the event of an emergency.
Tip 9 Assign a backup person too, in case the designee is not home during the emergency.
Tip 10 If windows or doors in your home have security bars, make sure that the bars have quick-release mechanisms inside so that they can be opened immediately in an emergency.  Quick-release mechanisms won't compromise your security - but they will increase your chances of safely escaping a home fire.
Tip 11 Tell guests or visitors to your home about your family's fire escape plan. When staying overnight at other people's homes, ask about their escape plan. If they don't have a plan in place, offer to help them make one. This is especially important when children are permitted to attend "sleepovers" at friends' homes.
Tip 12 Be fully prepared for a real fire: when a smoke alarm sounds, get out immediately. Residents of high-rise and apartment buildings may be safer "defending in place."
Tip 13 Once you're out, stay out! Under no circumstances should you ever go back into a burning building. If someone is missing, inform the fire department dispatcher when you call.  Firefighters have the skills and equipment to perform rescues.

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Smoke Alarms Save Lives:
Change your clock, Change your battery.

Tip 1 Test your smoke alarms once a month, following the manufacturer's instructions.
Tip 2 Replace the batteries in your smoke alarm once a year, or as soon as the alarm "chirps" warning that the battery is low.  Hint: schedule battery replacements for the same day you change your clocks from daylight savings time to standard time in the fall.
Tip 3 Never "borrow" a battery from a smoke alarm. Smoke alarms can't warn you of fire if their batteries are missing or have been disconnected.
Tip 4 Don't disable smoke alarms even temporarily. If your smoke alarm is sounding "nuisance alarms," try relocating it farther from kitchens or bathrooms,  where cooking fumes and steam can cause the alarm to sound.
Tip 5 Regularly vacuuming or dusting your smoke alarms, following the manufacturer's instructions, can keep them working properly. Smoke alarms don't last forever. Replace yours once every 10 years. If you can't remember how old the alarm is, then it's probably time for a new one. Consider installing smoke alarms with "long-life" (10-year) battery.

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Fire Extinguisher Tips:
PASS

Tip 1 Use a portable fire extinguisher when the fire is confined to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing; everyone has exited the building; the fire department has been called or is being called; and the room is not filled with smoke.
Tip 2 To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS:  

Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you, and release the locking mechanism.
Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

Tip 3 For the home, select a multi-purpose extinguisher (can be used on all types of home fires) that is large enough to put out a small fire, but not so heavy as to be difficult to handle.
Tip 4 Choose a fire extinguisher that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory.
Tip 5 Read the instructions that come with the fire extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. Local fire departments or fire equipment distributors often offer hands-on fire extinguisher trainings.
Tip 6 Install fire extinguishers close to an exit and keep your back to a clear exit when you use the device so you can make an easy escape if the fire cannot be controlled. 
Tip 7 If the room fills with smoke, leave immediately.
Tip 8 Know when to go. Fire extinguishers are one element of a fire response plan, but the primary element is safe escape.
Tip 9 Every household should have a home fire escape plan and working smoke alarms.

 

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